Few Showers this Weekend… forecast update 9pm @wvua23 #alwx

7 Day -SHELTON STATE Forecast - Offset Lows - PM.pngGood Thursday evening! It was a mild afternoon across the state with high reaching into the upper 80s low 90s and “feels like” temperatures in the mid 90s. We saw some scattered showers across the state but nothing too heavy here in central Alabama.

Tomorrow expect a similar day with highs in the low 90s and some showers after 1pm. Pack that umbrella because no one likes to get caught in the rain unprepared! Rain chances will start to lighten come Sunday and last through next Thursday. That means your labor is looking to have more sunshine and less rain right now! Get outside and enjoy your day off if you have one (I’ll be at the pool)!

Highs all week in the low 90s with lows back in the low 70s.

We do have a possible tropical storm developing off the coast of Africa right now. The storm has the potential to develop into a hurricane. The chances are likely right now for this to happen but not yet certain. The storm doesn’t have a developed center yet so the track isn’t completely certain. All the details will be released when they become available.

Danielle Davis

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Scattered Storms Remain Possible… Hot Weekend… Wednesday Forecast Update – 4:30pm #alwx @wvua23

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Good Thursday afternoon! We have a good number of scattered storms on radar as of 4:30pm, with the risk of scattered storms continuing into the evening hours before everything fades away tonight. Expect a muggy night as dewpoints remain high. Overnight lows will dip into the lower 70s.

Thursday and Friday will feature similar conditions. Highs will reach the lower 90s, with a fair chance of scattered storms developing during the afternoon. It will not rain all day, and storms will be hit or miss. Storms will be slow movers and may dump a heavy amount of rain in a small area.

Rain chances will decrease for the weekend, with highs in the lower to middle 90s. A few isolated PM storms will remain possible. We’ll be watching the Gulf with interest over the weekend, as some models pick up on a weak low developing in the northern Gulf. While this may not even happen, if it does, rain chances would have to be increased for atleast our southern counties. Models have been very inconsistent in this idea, so we will maintain a drier forecast for this update. If there is more evidence of a weak low developing over the weekend into early next week, we’ll quickly let you know.

Join us live on WVUA23 weekdays at 5, 6 and 10:00 P.M. and weekends at 10PM for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott
WVUA Chief Meteorologist
rscott@wvua23.com
Twitter: RichardWVUA23
Facebook: WVUA23RichardScott

Looking Back at Devastating Hurricane Katrina on Aug 29, 2005 #alwx @wvua23

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It was this day 13 years ago, when one of the worst US Natural Disasters to occur. On the morning prior to landfall, the National Weather Service issued a statement unlike one I’ve ever seen. This statement is chilling, but according to the data, accurate…

“””URGENT — WEATHER MESSAGE

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEW ORLEANS LA

1011 AM CDT SUN AUG 28, 2005

…DEVASTATING DAMAGE EXPECTED…

HURRICANE KATRINA…A MOST POWERFUL HURRICANE WITH UNPRECEDENTED STRENGTH… RIVALING THE INTENSITY OF HURRICANE CAMILLE OF 1969.

MOST OF THE AREA WILL BE UNINHABITABLE FOR WEEKS…PERHAPS LONGER. AT LEAST ONE HALF OF WELL CONSTRUCTED HOMES WILL HAVE ROOF AND WALL FAILURE. ALL GABLED ROOFS WILL FAIL…LEAVING THOSE HOMES SEVERELY DAMAGED OR DESTROYED.

THE MAJORITY OF INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS WILL BECOME NON FUNCTIONAL. PARTIAL TO COMPLETE WALL AND ROOF FAILURE IS EXPECTED. ALL WOOD FRAMED LOW RISING APARTMENT BUILDINGS WILL BE DESTROYED. CONCRETE BLOCK LOW RISE APARTMENTS WILL SUSTAIN MAJOR DAMAGE…INCLUDING SOME WALL AND ROOF FAILURE.

HIGH RISE OFFICE AND APARTMENT BUILDINGS WILL SWAY DANGEROUSLY…A FEW TO THE POINT OF TOTAL COLLAPSE. ALL WINDOWS WILL BLOW OUT.

AIRBORNE DEBRIS WILL BE WIDESPREAD…AND MAY INCLUDE HEAVY ITEMS SUCH AS HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EVEN LIGHT VEHICLES. SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES AND LIGHT TRUCKS WILL BE MOVED. THE BLOWN DEBRIS WILL CREATEADDITIONAL DESTRUCTION. PERSONS…PETS…AND LIVESTOCK EXPOSED TO THE WINDS WILL FACE CERTAIN DEATH IF STRUCK.

POWER OUTAGES WILL LAST FOR WEEKS…AS MOST POWER POLES WILL BE DOWN AND TRANSFORMERS DESTROYED. WATER SHORTAGES WILL MAKE HUMAN SUFFERING INCREDIBLE BY MODERN STANDARDS.

THE VAST MAJORITY OF NATIVE TREES WILL BE SNAPPED OR UPROOTED. ONLY THE HEARTIEST WILL REMAIN STANDING…BUT BE TOTALLY DEFOLIATED. FEW CROPS WILL REMAIN. LIVESTOCK LEFT EXPOSED TO THE WINDS WILL BE KILLED.

AN INLAND HURRICANE WIND WARNING IS ISSUED WHEN SUSTAINED WINDS NEAR HURRICANE FORCE…OR FREQUENT GUSTS AT OR ABOVE HURRICANE FORCE…ARE CERTAIN WITHIN THE NEXT 12 TO 24 HOURS.

ONCE TROPICAL STORM AND HURRICANE FORCE WINDS ONSET…DO NOT VENTURE OUTSIDE!””””

At 6:10am, on August 29, 2005, the eye of hurricane Katrina had made it’s first northern Gulf Coast landfall along the southeastern tip of Louisiana. It would then make a second landfall along the Mississippi Gulf Coast a few hours later, as it tracked north. There were actually 3 landfalls in the US with Katrina, with the first happening in southeast Florida, as the storm was just starting to get organized. Hurricane Katrina was a monster as it tracked across the gulf. The setup was perfect for this wild storm, due to extremely warm gulf water temperatures, no wind shear, no nearby dry air and general rising motion in the tropics.

The storm tracked around a ridge of high pressure, located from Bermuda to Georgia. There was a weakness in the ridge over the northern Gulf Coast, which caused the storm to turn north and impact our area, as well as the surrounding states.

What made Katrina such a mess for so many was her size. Katrina was an enormous storm… Small hurricanes typically die out quickly at landfall and the core of the strong winds and surge only affect a small area. With Katrina’s enormous size, the storm took a long time to weaken over land and the damaging winds and surge extended well out from the center. There was a storm surge in Gulf Shores similar to the one with Hurricane Ivan. Katrina made landfall over 100 miles away from Gulf Shores! The damaging winds extended hundreds of miles inland, which caused major issues, even across Alabama.

Below is a great article from the National Weather Service in Birmingham, which includes the local impacts from Katrina in west and central Alabama. Check it out!

Hurricane Katrina formed near Long Island in the Bahamas on the afternoon of August 23rd, 2005. Katrina reached hurricane strength just before making landfall north of Miami, Florida on the evening on August 25th, 2005. Katrina produced 10 to 20 inches of rain, flooding, tornadoes, and injuries across far southern Florida.

Katrina moved southwestward across the extreme southern tip of Florida and into the southeastern Gulf of Mexico. Katrina reached category five in the central Gulf of Mexico with sustained winds around 175 mph. This occurred on Sunday August 28th, 2005. Katrina then turned on a northward path.

Hurricane Katrina made landfall along the Gulf Coast early Monday morning August 29th, 2005 as a large category four hurricane. Sustained winds were around 145 mph in Southeast Louisiana. Katrina continued northward, affecting areas from near New Orleans, Louisiana to near Mobile, Alabama. Devastating damage occurred along the Gulf Coast. Katrina will most likely go down as one of the worst natural disasters in United States history.

Katrina weakened to a tropical storm Monday evening August 29th, 2005 northwest of Meridian, Mississippi. Katrina continued to move northward across far eastern Mississippi overnight, then into Tennessee Tuesday morning. Katrina finally lost its tropical characteristics as it merged with a cold front over northern Pennsylvania on August 31st, 2005.

Katrina produced local effects that were widespread across Central Alabama. Numerous trees and power lines were downed, minor to major structural damage occurred, and power outages were widespread. Many locations remained without power for a week or more. Storm damage effects across parts of West Central Alabama were worse than what was sustained during Hurricane Ivan in 2004.

Four tornadoes occurred across Central Alabama, two F0s and two F1s. Here is the information on those tornadoes.

Storm total rain amounts of 1 inch or less were measured in the northeast and east central portions of Central Alabama. This was due to dry air wrapping into the circulation Katrina and diminishing the rain area. Rain totals of 1 to 2 inches were common over the southeast sections. Rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 inches occurred over much of West Alabama, west of interstate 65. Some locations received 5 to 6 inch amounts in the northwest sections, specifically in Lamar and Marion Counties.

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The highest sustained winds from Katrina ranged from 25 mph along the Georgia state line to around 65 mph along the Mississippi state line. Peak wind gusts generally ranged from around 35 mph to near 80 mph, with the highest gusts occurring across West Central Alabama and in the highest elevations.

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Here are some peak wind gusts and storm total rainfall amounts associated with Hurricane Katrina.

Join us live on WVUA23 weekdays at 5, 6 and 10:00 P.M. and weekends at 10PM for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott
WVUA Chief Meteorologist
rscott@wvua23.com
Twitter: RichardWVUA23
Facebook: WVUA23RichardScott

Not Getting a Break From the Heat Any Time Soon – Tuesday Forecast Update – 3:30 PM #alwx @wvua23

iN9sQRZg.jpgGood Tuesday Afternoon! Another hot day we had in central Alabama today, with temperatures soaring back into the 90s, with most of the area staying dry today. Tonight temperatures will be back into the low to mid 70s with a partly cloudy sky.

Waking up Wednesday morning to temperatures in the low 70s, but we will once again be headed towards the 90s quickly. By 12 PM, the temperatures will be around 92 degrees. There is a chance to see an isolated thunderstorm pass by, but some spots in Alabama will remain dry. Wednesday night calls for low temperatures in the 70s, and humid conditions as well.

As for the remainder of the week, Thursday we have the best chance to see a thunderstorm, but some of us will not receive any rain at all. The heat remains in the forecast, with temperatures staying in the 90s.

If you’re looking ahead towards Saturday and are traveling for the Alabama vs. Louisville game, down in Orlando temperatures by kickoff time will be in the mid to low 80s, and by the ending of the game, at a warm 78 degrees.

Join us live on WVUA 23 weekdays at 5, 6, and 10 PM and weekends at 10 PM for the very latest on your news, weather, and sports.

Emily Owen

eowen@wvua23.com

Facebook: Emily Owen

Twitter: @EmilyOwen_WX

Heat Indices into the 100s for This Week – Monday Forecast Update – 4:15 PM #alwx @wvua23

NWd2gq4F.jpgIt’s been another hot day here in central Alabama. Temperatures soared back up into the 90s, and here in Tuscaloosa we actually saw a few sprinkles hit the ground for today. As for the forecast tonight, lows will be back in the low to mid 70s, and expect a partly cloudy sky due to a ridge along the Atlantic coast.

For Tuesday, the heat is still going to be sticking around and looks to not be going anywhere anytime soon! Highs will be back into the lower 90s for tomorrow, and we do have a slight chance for an afternoon thunderstorm. Most areas of central Alabama will be staying dry though. For Tuesday night, expect to still be under a partly cloudy sky, and temperatures to remain in the lower 70s.

The rest of the week is going to remain hot and muggy, and as we head towards the end of the week the rain chances pick back up due to some gulf moisture being funneled in. Most of the area will stay dry and sunny. The heat looks to be carrying over into next week, so don’t look for any relief anytime soon.

The heat indices for this week is the main concern. As temperatures continue to be in the low 90s and dew points in the low 70s, our feels like temperatures will be in the 100s.

Join us live on WVUA 23 weekdays at 5, 6, and 10 PM and weekends at 10 PM for the very latest on your news, weather, and sports.

Emily Owen

eowen@wvua23.com

Facebook: Emily Owen

Twitter: @EmilyOwen_WX

Only Two Words to Describe the Week Ahead….. Hot & Humid – Sunday Forecast Update – 2:20 PM #alwx @wvua23

oEM5F5eG.jpgGood Sunday afternoon, everyone! Another hot day is in store for us here in central Alabama. Temperatures will soar into the low 90s today, and the rain chances stay limited for today as well. As for tonight, lows will drop off into the mid to low 70s, and look for a partly cloudy sky.

For Monday, the beginning of a new week! Monday’s weather will remain the same, with hot temperatures and lots of humidity. We have a weather feature off to our west  over Texas that will be playing a role in the week ahead’s weather. Having an upper ridge build off to our west means that the hot temperatures and dry conditions look to be the story for the week ahead.

As we push our way towards the end of the week, the chance to see an isolated thunderstorm or rain shower improves as the moisture within the air increases, but most of central Alabama will stay dry and hot.

Join us live on WVUA 23 weekdays at 5, 6, and 10 PM, and weekends at 10 PM for the very latest on your news, weather, and sports.

Emily Owen

eowen@wvua23.com

Facebook: Emily Owen

Twitter: @EmilyOwen_WX

 

 

Plenty of Sunshine and Hot Temperatures – Saturday Forecast Update – 2:45 PM #alwx @wvua23

YSyjg5kS.jpg-large.jpegHappy Saturday everyone! We had a nice break from the heat and humidity this past week, but the break is over and we’re back to our typical Alabama summer time pattern.

Today is going to be a mostly sunny day, with temperatures reaching around 92 for a high today. The rain chances are holding off, so we’re going to remain dry and clear for today as well. Tonight looks to be a pleasant night for us, with lows in the mid to low 70s, and clear conditions as well.

As for Sunday, Sunday looks to be a carbon copy of Saturday, with hot temperatures and dry conditions. This weekend is one to spend outdoors and enjoy the sunshine!

The start of the new week ahead has temperatures remaining in the lower 90s, andsunshine. Moving closer to the end of the week, the chance for a passing thunderstorm or rain shower improves, but it’s a slim chance. Most of central Alabama will stay dry, hot, and humid.

Join us live on WVUA23 weekdays at 5, 6, and 10 PM, and weekends at 10 PM for the very latest on your news, weather, and sports.

Emily Owen

eowen@wvua23.com

Facebook: Emily Owen

Twitter: @EmilyOwen_WX