Quiet Weather Here… Devastating Hurricane Harvey Update… Thursday Forecast 5pm #alwx @wvua23

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Good Thursday afternoon! Humidity levels significantly dropped across the area today, as a north breeze ushers in low dewpoints. Temperatures will drop quickly tonight, with a low in the middle 60s. Areas north of I-20 will easily reach the lower 60s, under a clear sky.

We’ll see a few clouds around from time to time on Friday, but rain is not expected in our area. Highs will approach 90 on Friday. Clouds really increase on Saturday and Sunday, due to moisture blowing off Hurricane Harvey. A few isolated showers are possible on Saturday, but widespread rain is unlikely.

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Harvey is turning into a monster of a hurricane, something the US has not experienced since big storms like Ivan, Katrina and Rita in the 2004 and 2005 seasons. Where this storm comes inland, it will produce horrific damage from wind and coastal storm surge. The current forecast from the National Hurricane Center brings the storm in as a category 3, but there is a real chance it could be stronger at landfall. This storm is a direct threat to life and property. If you live near the coast and are in the path of Harvey, evacuate now! Unfortunately, there is not much time, as this is a rapidly changing situation. Not only will storm surge and wind be a significant factor, flooding will be to the levels of Allison back in 2001. Computer model data suggests widespread rain rates of 15 to 20 inches will fall along the coast of Texas and southwest Louisiana and stretch 50 to 100 miles inland from the coast. Isolated amounts of rain over 2 feet are likely as well where the heavier rainbands setup. Harvey will stall out near the central Texas Gulf coast and sit there through the weekend.

There is a good possibility that Harvey will then turn northeast, bringing rain to central and west Alabama by early to mid portions of next week, as the system gets pulled into the upper air trough. A few models move the center back over water and re-strengthens it a bit before moving into Louisiana early next week, but that thought is highly in question. Because of the setup between the ridge out west and the trough in the east, steering currents are going to become very weak and hard to predict. I feel confident that Harvey will turn northeast and bring rain to our weather some time next week, but when that happens is in question. We’ll update you as the situation unfolds.

For more updates, go to the weather blog at wvua23.com, scroll to the weather tab and click weather blog. Updates are also on our Facebook and Twitter page. My twitter is @RichardWVUA23 and facebook is WVUA23RichardScott

Join us live on WVUA23 weekdays at 5, 6 and 10:00 P.M. and weekends at 10PM for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott
WVUA Chief Meteorologist
rscott@wvua23.com
Twitter: RichardWVUA23
Facebook: WVUA23RichardScott

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Life-Threatening Disaster Setting Up for Texas… Thursday Update – 12:45pm #alwx @wvua23

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Good Thursday midday… As we watch satellite trends and updates from hurricane hunters, the deep sickening feeling is increasing for our friends along the Texas Gulf Coast. The last major hurricane to make landfall in the us was Wilma in 2005, nearly 12 years ago! Harvey is now a hurricane with winds up to 80mph, and it continues to rapidly organize. Most model data develops this storm into a major hurricane tonight, with landfall expected Friday night or early Saturday near or just northeast of Corpus Christi.

Harvey is turning into a monster of a hurricane, something the US has not experienced since big storms like Ivan, Katrina and Rita in the 2004 and 2005 seasons. Where this storm comes inland, it will produce horrific damage from wind and coastal storm surge. The current forecast from the National Hurricane Center brings the storm in as a category 3, but there is a real chance it could be stronger at landfall. This storm is a direct threat to life and property. If you live near the coast and are in the path of Harvey, evacuate now! Unfortunately, there is not much time, as this is a rapidly changing situation. Not only will storm surge and wind be a significant factor, flooding will be to the levels of Allison back in 2001. Computer model data suggests widespread rain rates of 15 to 20 inches will fall along the coast of Texas and southwest Louisiana and stretch 50 to 100 miles inland from the coast. Isolated amounts of rain over 2 feet are likely as well where the heavier rainbands setup. Harvey will stall out near the central Texas Gulf coast and sit there through the weekend.

There is a good possibility that Harvey will then turn northeast, bringing rain to central and west Alabama by early to mid portions of next week, as the system gets pulled into the upper air trough. A few models move the center back over water and re-strengthens it a bit before moving into Louisiana early next week, but that thought is highly in question. Because of the setup between the ridge out west and the trough in the east, steering currents are going to become very weak and hard to predict. I feel confident that Harvey will turn northeast and bring rain to our weather some time next week, but when that happens is in question. We’ll update you as the situation unfolds.

For more updates, go to the weather blog at wvua23.com, scroll to the weather tab and click weather blog. Updates are also on our Facebook and Twitter page. My twitter is @RichardWVUA23 and facebook is WVUA23RichardScott

Join us live on WVUA23 weekdays at 5, 6 and 10:00 P.M. and weekends at 10PM for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott
WVUA Chief Meteorologist
rscott@wvua23.com
Twitter: RichardWVUA23
Facebook: WVUA23RichardScott