Gloomy, Cold, Rainy Weather Continues… Monday Forecast Update – 4pm #alwx @wvua23

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Good Monday afternoon! Today is the textbook image of a gloomy day for Alabama. Periods of light to moderate rain continues today, with a soaking expected through the evening. Temperatures have only managed to warm into the upper 40s this afternoon, with is well below average for this time of the year. Rain will come to an end by midnight tonight, as dry and colder air moves in from the northwest.

Expect lows in the upper 30s tonight, but there is no risk of a frost or freeze. Skies will remain partly to mostly cloudy for our Tuesday, with a few peaks of sunshine by mid to late afternoon. Highs will top out in the low 50s on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, with areas north of I-20 in the 40s for highs. We’re going to deal with a back to back overnight freeze both Tuesday night and Wednesday night. Lows will fall into the middle to upper 20s both nights, so if you have plants that are cold sensitive, you may want to protect them…  We’ll warm some by the end of the week and the weekend, as highs return into the 60s and lows warm a bit as well.

Here’s my post on the anniversary of the Blizzard of 93 below…

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Yesterday and today is the 2 day anniversary of the blizzard of March 12-13 of 1993! The pics above are from Linden, Alabama. One pic above is the house I was raised in, and other pictures show me, my dad, one of my sisters and neighbors on this date in 1993. I was just a kid at the time, only 7 years old, but I can remember everything about that storm.

Today kicks off the anniversary of the “Superstorm,” where snow started falling heavy in west Alabama on this day in March. This was a 2 day event that I’ll never forget for sure. I was living in Linden at the time. Very heavy snow fell at my house in southwest Alabama for hours. We had over 8 inches of snow there. I’ll never forget the sound of trees cracking in the heavy snow and wind. The roads were covered in snow and trees blocked the roads in some areas, thanks to the heavy wet snow and strong winds. As just a kid at the time, it was a dream come true for me, but it turned out to be a disaster that cost lives along the entire eastern seaboard… Below is some information of the event.

The Storm of the Century, also known as the ’93 Superstorm, or the (Great) Blizzard of 1993, was a large cyclonic storm that occurred on March 12–13, 1993, on the East Coast of North America. It is unique for its intensity, massive size and wide-reaching effect. At its height, the storm stretched from Canada towards Central America, but its main impact was on the Eastern United States and Cuba. The cyclone moved through the Gulf of Mexico, and then through the Eastern United States before moving into Canada. Areas as far south as central Alabama and Georgia received 6 to 12 inches of snow and areas such as Birmingham, Alabama, received up to 12 inches with isolated reports of 16 inches. Even the Florida Panhandle reported up to 4 inches, with hurricane-force wind gusts and record low barometric pressures. Between Louisiana and Cuba, hurricane-force winds produced high storm surges across northwestern Florida, which along with scattered tornadoes killed dozens of people. Record cold temperatures were seen across portions of the South and East in the wake of this storm. In the United States, the storm was responsible for the loss of electric power to over 10 million customers. It is purported to have been directly experienced by nearly 40 percent of the country’s population at that time. A total of 310 people, including 10 from Cuba, perished during this storm.

For more updates, go to the weather blog at wvua23.com, scroll to the weather tab and click weather blog. Updates are also on our Facebook and Twitter page. My twitter is @RichardWVUA23 and facebook is WVUA23RichardScott

Join us live on WVUA23 weekdays at 5, 6 and 10:00 P.M. and weekends at 10PM for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott
WVUA Chief Meteorologist
rscott@wvua23.com
Twitter: RichardWVUA23
Facebook: WVUA23RichardScott

Looking Back at the Blizzard of 1993… Monday Update – 3pm #alwx @wvua23

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Yesterday and today is the 2 day anniversary of the blizzard of March 12-13 of 1993! The pics above are from Linden, Alabama. One pic above is the house I was raised in, and other pictures show me, my dad, one of my sisters and neighbors on this date in 1993. I was just a kid at the time, only 7 years old, but I can remember everything about that storm.

Today kicks off the anniversary of the “Superstorm,” where snow started falling heavy in west Alabama on this day in March. This was a 2 day event that I’ll never forget for sure. I was living in Linden at the time. Very heavy snow fell at my house in southwest Alabama for hours. We had over 8 inches of snow there. I’ll never forget the sound of trees cracking in the heavy snow and wind. The roads were covered in snow and trees blocked the roads in some areas, thanks to the heavy wet snow and strong winds. As just a kid at the time, it was a dream come true for me, but it turned out to be a disaster that cost lives along the entire eastern seaboard… Below is some information of the event.

The Storm of the Century, also known as the ’93 Superstorm, or the (Great) Blizzard of 1993, was a large cyclonic storm that occurred on March 12–13, 1993, on the East Coast of North America. It is unique for its intensity, massive size and wide-reaching effect. At its height, the storm stretched from Canada towards Central America, but its main impact was on the Eastern United States and Cuba. The cyclone moved through the Gulf of Mexico, and then through the Eastern United States before moving into Canada. Areas as far south as central Alabama and Georgia received 6 to 12 inches of snow and areas such as Birmingham, Alabama, received up to 12 inches with isolated reports of 16 inches. Even the Florida Panhandle reported up to 4 inches, with hurricane-force wind gusts and record low barometric pressures. Between Louisiana and Cuba, hurricane-force winds produced high storm surges across northwestern Florida, which along with scattered tornadoes killed dozens of people. Record cold temperatures were seen across portions of the South and East in the wake of this storm. In the United States, the storm was responsible for the loss of electric power to over 10 million customers. It is purported to have been directly experienced by nearly 40 percent of the country’s population at that time. A total of 310 people, including 10 from Cuba, perished during this storm.

For more updates, go to the weather blog at wvua23.com, scroll to the weather tab and click weather blog. Updates are also on our Facebook and Twitter page. My twitter is @RichardWVUA23 and facebook is WVUA23RichardScott

Join us live on WVUA23 weekdays at 5, 6 and 10:00 P.M. and weekends at 10PM for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott
WVUA Chief Meteorologist
rscott@wvua23.com
Twitter: RichardWVUA23
Facebook: WVUA23RichardScott