No Tornadoes In Alabama In April!!!! Monday Update 5:20 PM

…PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT…

…NO CONFIRMED TORNADOES IN ALABAMA FOR APRIL 2012…

MERELY ONE YEAR AFTER ESTABLISHING THE RECORD FOR THE MOST TORNADOES IN A SINGLE MONTH IN ALABAMA…ACTUALLY BREAKING THE PREVIOUS ANNUAL RECORD IN A SINGLE MONTH…THERE HAS NOT BEEN A SINGLE CONFIRMED TORNADO REPORTED IN ALABAMA IN THE MONTH OF APRIL 2012. THE LAST TIME ALABAMA EXPERIENCED A TORNADO-FREE APRIL WAS IN 2004. THIS RESPITE COMES AS AN OBVIOUS RELIEF TO TORNADO STRICKEN CITIZENS OF ALABAMA…MANY OF WHOM ARE STILL RECOVERING FROM THE DEVASTATING APRIL 27TH 2011 OUTBREAK.

WHY SO MANY TORNADOES LAST YEAR AND SO FEW TORNADOES THIS YEAR? WHILE LAST YEAR`S PATTERN WAS FAVORABLE AND ACTIVE…FOR MUCH OF SPRING 2012 WE HAVE SEEN THE PRESENCE OF A PATTERN MORE LIKE EARLY SUMMER…WITH WARMER AND DRIER THAN NORMAL CONDITIONS ACROSS MUCH OF THE SOUTHEAST. A BLOCKING PATTERN IN THE NORTHERN ATLANTIC HAS MOVED THE POLAR/SUBTROPICAL JETS FURTHER NORTHWARD ALLOWING FOR AN EXPANSIVE RIDGE/HIGH PRESSURE TO REMAIN IN PLACE OVER THE SOUTHEASTERN CONUS FOR MUCH OF THE SEASON…WITH LITTLE CHANCE OF MOVING IT OVER THE NEXT WEEK OR IN THE NEAR FUTURE. WHILE THIS PATTERN CHANGE HAS CERTAINLY REDUCED THE THREAT FOR SEVERE WEATHER IN ALABAMA, IT ALSO HAS BEEN CONDUCIVE FOR SHORT TERM DROUGHT, WHICH WE WOULD CERTAINLY BE BETTER WITHOUT.

WHILE WE HAVE BEEN FORTUNATE WITH A MUCH MORE FAVORABLE 2012 SPRING SEASON THUS FAR…EVEN WITH WHAT APPEARS TO BE A REDUCED THREAT…IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMAIN VIGILANT AS WE CLOSE OUT THE SPRING PEAK TORNADO SEASON IN ALABAMA, WHICH RUNS THROUGH THE END OF MAY.

WVUA Chief Meteorologist Richard Scott

rscott@wvuatv.com

Source: NWS Birmingham

Hot Weather Continues…Monday Afternoon Forecast Discussion – 4:30PM

Good Monday afternoon to you! It’s hot this afternoon, with many spots in the upper 80s to lower 90s. The hot air over the weekend and this week is in response to a strong summer ridge. A ridge is associated with warmer air, while a trough is associated with cooler air. Not only is it hot, but a south flow at the surface has brought higher moisture values into our area. The pattern will remain fairly consistent over the next 7 days, but there are some changes as we approach the weekend.

The short term forecast will remain dry and hot. Temperatures will slowly fall into the lower 60s tonight. While temperatures will settle down into the nice range tonight, conditions will feel a little muggy. There’s no risk of rain this afternoon or tonight. The ridge will be centered right over Alabama on Tuesday, so look for temperatures to reach the 90 degree mark under a mostly sunny ski. Some afternoon cumulus clouds will develop, but the ridge should suppress any showers or storms from developing. The ridge will weaken slightly over Alabama on Thursday, Friday and Saturday; this will allow for the risk of a few afternoon storms. I don’t expect a high coverage of rain and storms, but a shower could pop up at your house. We are starting to fall behind on the rain totals, so we could really use a beneficial rain in the area. So far, forecast data is suggesting we will remain mostly dry through the weekend.

Temperatures will come down a few degrees on Thursday, Friday and Saturday due to a little extra cloud cover and a weaker ridge over our area. Highs will top out in the upper 80s, so it will still feel hot through the weekend. Lows will remain in the lower to middle 60s each night through early next week.

Send us your weather pictures! Send them to weather@wvuatv.com. Also, look us up on facebook and twitter by searching weather@wvuatv.com or searching WVUA-TV Weather. We also have a new like page on facebook, called WVUA-TV Weather. Since we’re running out of room on the friend page, I recommend you like us on facebook. Great way to get weather updates! Plus, facebook is a great way to send us weather pictures. Simply tag us!

Also, join us live on WVUA-TV weekdays at 4, 5, 6 and 10 pm and weekends at 10pm for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott

WVUA Chief Meteorologist

rscott@wvuatv.com

Saturday Evening Forecast Discussion – 9:55 p.m.

Its more of the same for West Alabama over the next few days. High pressure will remain over much of the Southeast for the time being allowing our temperatures to hang around the 90 degree mark. With the high in place and a low over Texas we are seeing a south to southwesterly flow across the area tonight and tomorrow. There is some patchy fog possible across parts of our area.

Tomorrow we expect the temperature to get very close if not hit 90 degrees, very warm for this time of year. Overnight lows will hang in the mid to low 60s throughout the week. The only day that I put in a chance of showers for is Thursday. There is a very small chance that we will see any rain, but we can’t rule out a pop up afternoon shower with all of this heating that we are likely to see.

The name of the game for the week ahead is sunny and hot.

Send us your weather pictures! Send them to weather@wvuatv.com. Also, look us up on facebook and twitter by searching weather@wvuatv.com or searching WVUA-TV Weather. We also have a new like page on facebook, called WVUA-TV Weather. Since we’re running out of room on the friend page, I recommend you like us on facebook. Great way to get weather updates! Plus, facebook is a great way to send us weather pictures. Simply tag us!

Also, join us live on WVUA-TV weekdays at 4, 5, 6 and 10 pm and weekends at 10pm for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Daniel Sparkman
dsparkman@wvuatv.com
WVUA Weather

Hot Weather Continues…Friday, April 27th Forecast Update 4:21 PM

Good Friday afternoon to you! Today is a big day for many of us, as we make it through the 1 year mark of the historic tornado outbreak anniversary. 62 tornadoes tracked through Alabama within a 24 hour time stamp and 253 Alabamians died in the storms. As of the moment I’m writing this discussion, we are 1 hour away from impact of the tornado that hit Tuscaloosa. At this very moment last year, there were numerous tornadoes tracking across our state. Be sure to scroll down to my post earlier today for full details on the event and my personal story.

Today is a new day and a nice day in respect to what we dealt with this time last year. It is rather hot this afternoon, but a little extra cloud cover has kept temperatures a tad lower than expected. Most spots have topped out in the lower 80s this afternoon. With all of the memorial events happening across central Alabama, conditions are looking nice and dry. An isolated shower or storm is possible through 7pm, but most people will remain rain-free. A summer ridge has developed across the heartland of the nation and is moving east. This is causing temperatures around here to warm into the 80s. As the ridge intensifies a bit over the weekend and early next week, temperatures could easily reach 90 degrees. Under influence of the ridge, don’t expect any significant rain chances. A stray afternoon storm is possible each day, but most spots will stay dry. The chance of rain is less than 10% today through next Friday.

Highs will top out between 87 and 91 Saturday through next Friday, as the area continues to deal with a consistent pattern. Lows at night will fall into the lower 60s each night. Other than a little increase in temperatures late in the weekend and early next week, you could copy Saturday’s forecast and paste it to each day over the next 7 days. The ridge will continue to influence our weather through late next week. Expect skies to remain partly cloudy each day.

Send us your weather pictures! Send them to weather@wvuatv.com. Also, look us up on facebook and twitter by searching weather@wvuatv.com or searching WVUA-TV Weather. We also have a new like page on facebook, called WVUA-TV Weather. Since we’re running out of room on the friend page, I recommend you like us on facebook. Great way to get weather updates! Plus, facebook is a great way to send us weather pictures. Simply tag us!

Also, join us live on WVUA-TV weekdays at 4, 5, 6 and 10 pm and weekends at 10pm for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott

WVUA Chief Meteorologist

rscott@wvuatv.com

April 27th, 2011… A Deadly Day In Alabama’s History! One Year Ago Today. Friday Update 9:40 AM

Above is a clip of our coverage before we lost power due to the massive Tuscaloosa tornado. We are in a building called Reese Phifer Hall on the University of Alabama campus. UA campus has a very protected power supply, so we never invested in a back-up generator. There was never a need for one because the power source was very secure. We lost power on April 27th, as the tornado was tracking into the Forest Lake area of Tuscaloosa. The tornado destroyed 4 power substations in Tuscaloosa, so to say the least, that took our power supply. We were brushed by the tornado as it tracked through town. The core of the tornado missed us by 0.90 miles, but inflow winds were estimated at 80 mph at our TV Station.

It was 1 year ago today, when a horrible tornado outbreak changed my life. It’s a day that affected so many people on so many ways. Not only did a powerful tornado hit the city of Tuscaloosa, Alberta City and Holt, but 62 tornadoes tracked across the state. Many people lost their home, including myself. I lived in a neighborhood behind Big Lots and Hobby Lobby. I was so fortunate because I survived the storm, and so did all of my close friends and family. Numerous friends of mine did lose their home or apartment, but they made it out with their life, and that’s what’s most important in the end.

The days leading up to the big outbreak were more than concerning, they were downright frightening. We had a dangerous squall line move through that morning, which left many without power. When the sun came out early that morning, many folks though the severe weather was over, but the worst was yet to come. The sun added to the instability. The instability was a disastrous ingredient thrown into strong wind shear. Shear and instability are the ingredients that aren’t good to have together.

Every storm was producing large tornadoes, and the chance of tornadoes in one area was higher than I’ve ever seen before. Since the Tuscaloosa/Birmingham tornado affected me personally, I’ll focus on that tornado. Understand, there were 62 tornadoes that day that led to the largest single day tornado outbreak in Alabama’s history and nearly the most deadly. So many people were affected outside the large cities, in small towns scattered across the state.

The first tornado of the afternoon round hit downtown Cullman just after 3pm. After seeing video and hearing reports of what just happened in that area, Daniel Sparkman and I knew this really was going to be as bad as expected. A small supercell storm had just produced a large tornado in a large town; it was a disaster already.

At about 4pm, we started eyeballing a storm that was located in east Mississippi. This storm had a path directly towards Tuscaloosa. It was producing a tornado as it crossed the state line. Once it moved into Tuscaloosa County, we got the report of a wedge tornado with this storm. That was frightening! We knew this would become a disaster for the city of Tuscaloosa, Holt and Alberta City. We got the first glimpse of the tornado from our Tuscaloosa towercam when it was 20 miles away. It was at 5:13pm, when the tornado moved into the southwest side of Tuscaloosa. The warning system was as good as it gets for the storm, yet the tornado was so large, it was simply un-survivable in spots. Be sure to watch the video above from our severe weather coverage. It’s amazing that we stayed on air as long as we could. The main thought going through my mind at the time was warn as many as we can before we get hit. I thought the tornado was going to make a direct hit on our TV station. We were very close! Fortunately, the tornado just missed us to the south by 0.90 miles. Aka. Less that one mile…

After the tornado hit and we and lost power, I knew we had no way to broadcast on television. My main concern was getting to my house, where my roommate and WVUA Director, Jonathan Newman, was at the time. I had no idea what to expect, but I feared the worst. I parked my truck on the side of McFarland BLVD less than 10 minutes after the tornado hit. Rescue personal wasn’t even on the scene just yet. The sound of store and car alarms and police sirens filled the air. The smell of mud, tree sap and natural gas was so strong, it would nearly choke you. The sight of people climbing out of a pile of wood and brick was a sight I’ll never forget. When I got to my house, Jonathan was standing in the front yard. I was so relieved when I saw he was ok and so were my neighbors. Some of my neighbors had injuries, but they were not life-threatening. Unfortunately, that was a different story only 200 yards away, where several people didn’t survive the storm. More than 50 people died in Tuscaloosa alone and over 250 people died in the state of Alabama, making it one of the most deadly tornado outbreaks in US and state history. Below is a picture of my house the day after the tornado hit.

This event changed my life, and I’ll never look at storms the same way. Severe weather will continue to happen at times, and that’s a part of life we will have to live with. I don’t think we will ever see an event nearly the magnitude of this one. It only takes one tornado, so please take every warning serious.

Above is a map across our area that shows the tornado tracks and ratings on April 27th. This map tells a big story!

We will have special coverage again today on WVUA news at 4, 5, 6 and 10pm, so be sure to join us for that!

Be sure to join me on WVUA-TV news at 4, 5, 6 and 10pm weekdays for the latest on your forecast. Also, look us up on facebook and twitter by searching weather@wvuatv.com. You can like us on facebook by searching our new page WVUA-TV Weather. Also, send us your weather pictures by e-mail to weather@wvuatv.com. Have a great day!

WVUA Chief Meteorologist Richard Scott

rscott@wvuatv.com

Map Source: NWS Birmingham

Looking Back…April 27th, 2011, A Killer Tornado Outbreak – Thursday Update 9pm

Good Thursday evening to you! Above is something meteorologists often look at when building a forecast. This really comes in handy during times of winter weather and severe weather. It’s a computer software program called Bufkit. We run computer models through this program and are able to look at numerous severe weather parameters and the atmosphere in a detailed way. This image may not mean much to some of you, but to others, it’s frightening.

This is the 18Z run of the NAM, valid for 4pm Wednesday, April 27th, 2011. The numbers on the left side indicate some of our severe weather parameters. The red highlighted parameters, show where values are at high or extreme levels. For someone getting ready for a severe weather event, that’s not a good sign. CAPE (a measure of instability) values are extremely high, so the air will have no problem rising and violently. Wind shear or Helicity is at 555 m2/s2, which is extreme. To put things rather simple, the two main ingredients for severe weather are instability and shear. A third ingredient is lift, and there was a very strong lifting mechanism about to move through the area. All the other parameters we use were maxed out or close to it. There was nothing to indicate this wouldn’t be a horrible severe weather day across our state. All meteorologists out there knew it was going to be very bad, but there’s nothing we could do to stop this event from unfolding. All we could do is warn as many as possible. The atmosphere was also primed for supercell storms. These are the most violent type of thunderstorms and often produce the large, long tracking tornadoes.

I remember looking at this data on my dinner break that Tuesday evening. The new data ran chills down my back because of how serious this looked. At this point 1 year ago, we were only about 6 hours from starting our first round of active severe weather and 16 hours before starting the main action; the afternoon round…

Richard Scott

WVUA Chief Meteorologist

rscott@wvuatv.com

Hot, Hazy and Humid, Summer Is Here! – Thursday Afternoon Forecast 5pm Update

Good Thursday afternoon to you! Be sure to scroll down to the previous post on April 27th. We’ve been looking back at the 1 year anniversary which is tomorrow.

The weather has been rather hot today, as a strong summer ridge builds into our area from the west. Computer data has increased the strength of the ridge over our area late in the weekend and early next week, so I’ve bumped temperatures up to 90 degrees on Sunday through Tuesday. It’s amazing how fast Alabama’s weather can change. We were talking chilly temperatures just a few days ago, now we’re expecting temperatures to reach 90 this weekend.

The risk of rain is very low this evening and tonight, but a passing shower or storm can’t be ruled out across our far northern counties. The chance of an isolated storm would include areas north of Fayette and Jasper. A weakening cold front is moving across central Tennessee this evening, but the front will halt its southern progress as it battles a ridge across our area. Temperatures will fall into the lower 60s tonight, and each night through the weekend and into next week. The pattern will not change much over the coming days. Moisture levels have increased across Alabama and will continue to increase. Expect conditions to feel a little muggy through next week.

Afternoon highs will remain in the upper 80s on Friday and Saturday, but lower 90s are expected Sunday through Tuesday. Skies will become partly cloudy each day, but expect more sun than clouds. The ridge will weaken a tad late next week, so that should allow temperatures to drop a few degrees. Look for highs to top out in the upper 80s on Wednesday and Thursday, rather than lower 90s. So far, there’s no sign of any active severe weather across Alabama over the next two weeks.

Send us your weather pictures! Send them to weather@wvuatv.com. Also, look us up on facebook and twitter by searching weather@wvuatv.com or searching WVUA-TV Weather. We also have a new like page on facebook, called WVUA-TV Weather. Since we’re running out of room on the friend page, I recommend you like us on facebook. Great way to get weather updates! Plus, facebook is a great way to send us weather pictures. Simply tag us!

Also, join us live on WVUA-TV weekdays at 4, 5, 6 and 10 pm and weekends at 10pm for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott

WVUA Chief Meteorologist

rscott@wvuatv.com

Looking Back At April 27, 2011…The Day Before The Disaster… Thursday Update 4:38 PM

Good Thursday afternoon to you! We’re looking back today at April 26, 2011…One day before the horrifying tornado outbreak that would occur, killing over 250 people in Alabama and injuring several thousand. Below is an evening update I posted on April 26, 2011, looking into the threat of a historic tornado outbreak less than 24 hours away. The forecast was chilling for sure!

Here is one of many posts I made prior to the event starting: (Not today’s forecast)

So far, all indications are that west and central Alabama will deal with a major severe weather/tornado outbreak Wednesday afternoon. All of the severe weather parameters that we look at when forecasting severe weather are maxed out over west and centralAlabama, where numbers are somewhat disturbing. Tomorrow afternoon, we will have the rare mix of high instability, high wind shear and strong lift. Usually, there is atleast one limiting factor, but I just can’t find one tonight. There was some thought that a squall line would move into central Alabama late tonight or early tomorrow. This could disrupt a major outbreak, with cooler and more stable air. Also, with morning rain, we would delay the surface heating before the better dynamics reach Alabama. After looking at radar trends, it looks unlikely that a line will move into central Alabama tonight or early tomorrow.

This means that conditions will become more and more unstable during the morning hours. A cap, or a layer of warmer temperatures aloft, will keep premature storms from popping up during the morning hours. As the surface heats up, the cap will break and supercell storms will fire up across our western counties first, then they will spread northeastward. It looks like we’ll have a period of sun during the mid morning hours, which will add more fuel to the fire, with even more heat and instability. The severe weather parameters point to a major tornado outbreak across most of our area, with the best chance of tornadoes happening along I-20/59 and points north. There is still a big risk of severe weather to the south of the interstate, but the highest threat will exist to the north. As of now, the Storm Prediction Center has much of our area under a moderate risk of severe weather, but an upgrade to a high risk looks likely at this point. I’ll post the new outlook once it comes out later tonight. The time frame is looking the same. Storms could begin as early as lunch in west Alabama and continue as late as 9pm in our area. Tornadoes, damaging winds and large hail will be a big concern. Some tornadoes could be large or violent and long tracking. I’m not trying to scare you, but I just want you to be aware of the possibilities.

Go over your severe weather safety plans now. Don’t wait until the storms fire up because it’s too late then. Remember a few safety tips if a tornado warning is issued for you. Get in the center portion of your home, away from windows. Find an interior room, closet or basement and stay there until the threat is over. If you’re in a car, pull over and seek shelter immediately. If you live in a mobile home, get out and find a sight built home or storm shelter. In-fact, once the tornado watch is issued, go ahead and leave your mobile home and find a friend with a site built home. Don’t go back until the threat is over, which appears to be after 9pm Wednesday night. If a tornado strikes your house, please be careful and look out for downed powerlines. You never know if the lines still have electricity. Also, evacuate the area hit by a tornado incase of ruptured gas lines or other hazards.

End Of April 26, 2011 Discussion

Again, that was a post from April 26, 2011. I didn’t post this to harp on bad feelings, but I think it’s important to respect our history. This was such a big day in my life, as well as many of you. I lost my home that day in the tornado that tracked through Tuscaloosa. My roomate, a WVUA-TV director was at the house when the tornado hit. He took shelter in my bath tub and made it through the storm. Fortunately, all of my neighbors made it through the tornado with their life. While some neighbors were injured, they survived. Since that day, all houses in my neighborhood have been torn down, and there’s nothing but green fields left. My family and friends were there for me after the storm, and I can’t thank you enough for your love and support. My prayers continue to go out for the ones that lost family members and friends.

Richard Scott

WVUA Chief Meteorologist

rscott@wvuatv.com

 

Hot Days Ahead! Humid Weather Returns, Looking Back At April 27th – Wednesday Afternoon Forecast Update 4:40 PM

Good Wednesday afternoon to you! It’s hot this afternoon, as many locations warm into the middle 80s. We’ve dealt with our last cool snap earlier this week, now we’re beginning a stretch of hot air. Not only will temperatures become hot over the coming days, humidity will give us some problems. The progressive pattern is about to come to a halt over the next week or so, as ridging takes over for a while.

As dewpoints climb, temperatures won’t be able to cool as much tonight. Remember, the air temperature can’t fall below the dewpoint. Temperatures will bottom off in the lower 60s tonight. Some spots will reach the upper 50s, but conditions will feel fairly mild over the next few mornings. A strong ridge across the central Plains is baking our friends to the west of Alabama. Temperatures in the 100 degree range are affecting much of Texas, with 90s as far north as Nebraska and Iowa. As the ridge slides east, some spots in Alabama will reach the lower 90s on Friday through Monday, but forecast highs are in the upper 80s. Most spots will reach the upper 80s, but the risk of a 90 degree temperature will be very isolated. As the ground starts to dry out through the weekend and early next week, a few more spots may reach 90.

Humid weather will make an unwelcome return tomorrow through the middle of next week. High dewpoint temperatures will give us some issues with high heat index values. Heat index values may reach 92 over the weekend and early next week. Rain chances will remain very low, so don’t count on rain relief. If a storm pops up over your area, it won’t last long. The chance of rain is at 10 to 20% during the afternoon hours starting on Saturday and lasting through Wednesday of next week.

Friday is a big day in Alabama’s history. We reach the 1 year mark of the historic April 27th tornado outbreak, where 62 tornadoes tracked across Alabama. If you’re reading this post, then you survived one of the worst tornado outbreaks in both Alabama and our Nations’ history. This time last year, our weather and news team were getting ready for coverage of what looked to be a dangerous tornado outbreak. Model data latched on to a very scary look over 7 days prior to this event getting kicked off. We were now 2 days prior to a horrible outbreak. All severe weather parameters were off the charts, showing values higher than many of us have seen before. At this point, my thought was to convince our viewers that this looks to be a day where large, violent tornadoes would track across our state and for people to be alert for forecasting changes before the event got started.

The big message was to have a plan ready to go when a tornado warning would be issued for your area, and this wasn’t a typical severe weather risk. While I didn’t say it on air at this point, my thoughts were that some people may not survive this event, especially if forecast data would be correct. As we all know, our data would turn out be correct 2 days later and over 250 people Alabamians would lose their life in this event. What could we have done different that day? Could we have done anything to reduce the fatality rate? Were the tornadoes so strong that day that many people died because there was no escaping the violent winds of these large tornadoes? Did people simply do nothing and didn’t take our warning serious? These questions have haunted me over the past year. I hope and pray we never deal with an event like this again in our future, but you’ve got to understand that we will have more tornadoes ahead. Please take all warnings serious in the days ahead, even in the lowest threat. It only takes one tornado to threaten life and property. We’ll be here and on air, so you can always depend on us for non-stop tornado coverage. We all do this as a free service for you.  

Send us your weather pictures! Send them to weather@wvuatv.com. Also, look us up on facebook and twitter by searching weather@wvuatv.com or searching WVUA-TV Weather. We also have a new like page on facebook, called WVUA-TV Weather. Since we’re running out of room on the friend page, I recommend you like us on facebook. Great way to get weather updates! Plus, facebook is a great way to send us weather pictures. Simply tag us!

Also, join us live on WVUA-TV weekdays at 4, 5, 6 and 10 pm and weekends at 10pm for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott

WVUA Chief Meteorologist

rscott@wvuatv.com

 

Cold Lastnight! Look Back At Lastnight’s Lows – Tuesday Update 5:40 PM

Good Tuesday to you! Here’s a look back at our late April chill-down. Temperatures reached the upper 30s to lower 40s across much of the area lastnight, but some spots were a bit cooler. Here’s a list of lows lastnight:

Tuscaloosa: 39

Coker: 37 Ronald Hughes

Northport: 36 Barry Durand

Hayden: 37 Nathan

Hamilton: 32

Selma: 43

Clayton: 41

Addison: 37

Troy: 35

Anniston: 39

Auburn: 43

Birmingham: 41

If you would like to be a weather watcher for WVUA-TV, all you have to do is send an e-mail or facebook message to us. We would like your daily high/low and rain totals. Below is how you can send us this info.

Send us your weather pictures! Send them to weather@wvuatv.com. Also, look us up on facebook and twitter by searching weather@wvuatv.com or searching WVUA-TV Weather. We also have a new like page on facebook, called WVUA-TV Weather. Since we’re running out of room on the friend page, I recommend you like us on facebook. Great way to get weather updates! Plus, facebook is a great way to send us weather pictures. Simply tag us!

Also, join us live on WVUA-TV weekdays at 4, 5, 6 and 10 pm and weekends at 10pm for the very latest on your news, weather and sports.

Richard Scott

WVUA Chief Meteorologist

rscott@wvuatv.com