Hurricane Katrina, 4 Years Later…

On the morning of August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall near the Louisiana/Mississippi border as a strong category three hurricane with sustained wind gusts of 125 mph. Hurricane force winds pounded coastal areas of southeast Louisiana and southern Mississippi, bringing about massive structural damage and destruction. Moreover, a catastrophic storm surge flood ensued as 24 to 27 feet of water moved ashore and precipitated widespread flooding and eventually caused the levees in the city of New Orleans to fail. Hurricane Katrina continued northward through eastern Mississippi, bringing hurricane force wind gusts into central and west-central Alabama during the afternoon and evening of August 29.

The city of New Orleans, as a result of Hurricane Katrina, was uninhabitable for weeks because of widespread wind damage and massive flooding. Residents were not allowed to return to their homes for weeks following the hurricane. In fact, the National Weather Service office in New Orleans, LA was unable to carry out operations for its forecast area; therefore, the Mobile office covered New Orleans’ area for weeks following Katrina.

A few memorable excerpts from the last statement issued by the National Weather Service in New Orleans before the hurricane hit:

MOST OF THE AREA WILL BE UNINHABITABLE FOR WEEKS…PERHAPS LONGER. ATLEAST ONE HALF OF WELL CONSTRUCTED HOMES WILL HAVE ROOF AND WALLFAILURE. ALL GABLED ROOFS WILL FAIL…LEAVING THOSE HOMES SEVERELYDAMAGED OR DESTROYED.

POWER OUTAGES WILL LAST FOR WEEKS…AS MOST POWER POLES WILL BE DOWN AND TRANSFORMERS DESTROYED. WATER SHORTAGES WILL MAKE HUMAN SUFFERING INCREDIBLE BY MODERN STANDARDS.

HIGH RISE OFFICE AND APARTMENT BUILDINGS WILL SWAY DANGEROUSLY…A FEW TO THE POINT OF TOTAL COLLAPSE. ALL WINDOWS WILL BLOW OUT.

A link to the entire statement issued can be found here:

Isaac Williams
WVUA-Weather

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