Partly Cloudy and Quiet….

We will see a pretty quiet night tonight with overnight lows dropping down to 73 degrees.  Tomorrow, a mix of sun and clouds with a 50% chance for a shower or storm during the afternoon.  Highs tomorrow afternoon topping out at 91 degrees.  Tomorrow does appear to be the best chance of rain for us here in West Alabama.  The workweek looks to see a 20-30% chance each afternoon with highs in the lower 90s and overnight lows in the lower 70s.  Have a great night!

Updated By:  Meteorologist Michael White

Severe Weather Update/Saturday Afternoon

Taking a look at the radar this afternoon, I see a few pop-up showers across parts or the state. Most of the action has been from a line between Columbus, MS, and Demopolis. The rainfall amounts have been generally light, but some places may get a quick shower over the next couple of hours. According to Doppler radar estimates, the best amounts of rain have fell in Marengo County, with almost none falling in Tuscaloosa County. Stay tuned for your latest home team weather forecast tonight at 5, 6, and 10.

WVUA Weather:

Richard Scott

Severe Weather Update

We are currently watching the storms south of Tuscaloosa where they have just cancelled the Severe Thunderstorm Warnings for Hale and Marengo Counties. These storms do not have a warning associated with them anymore, but these are still very dangerous storms with heavy rain, strong winds, and dangerous cloud to ground lightning. These storms are moving north and have winds of 35-45 mph. We will keep you posted here on the WVUA Blog.

WVUA Weather Intern

 Michael Hill

Severe T-Storm Warning/Friday Afternoon Discussion Update

First off, a severe thunderstorm warning was just issued for North Central Jefferson County. The warning goes until 5:00. Nickel size hail, damaging winds, and dangerous lightning will be possible 6 miles northeast of Sayre and near Warrior. This storm is drifting northward. We’ll keep posted!

 I’ve given in and started taking request for rain! I’ve had two people approach me and say they needed rain in their neighborhood. One viewer from Fosters told me that he measured 0.20” of rain this week and less than a quarter mile away, a neighbor measured 2.20.” I told the viewer, “I certainly know what you’re talking about.” Here at the station we’ve had two good downpours this week; however, at my house in south Tuscaloosa, I haven’t seen a single drop of rain!

Even though I can’t create rain, I’ll certainly be watching the radar and cheering on the chance of more rain reaching our area. Today we’ve had more scattered thunderstorms, as forecasted. Unfortunately, the activity has been widely scattered and drifting slowly through the area. Tomorrow I’m expecting a better coverage of afternoon thunderstorms. Our friends at the National Weather Service brought up a good point in their afternoon discussion. Due to better upper air support, the storms tomorrow will be covering more real estate. Therefore, if your working outdoors tomorrow afternoon and a storm pops up, it should pass along, rather than sitting in one spot all afternoon. Temperatures will be warming into the lower 90s tomorrow, with the heat index value approaching 100-degrees at times. We’re going to be begging for rain tomorrow, to at-least help cool us off.

A weakening front will drop into the state tomorrow and this will be the trigger for the afternoon thunderstorms. The front will be in the vicinity on Sunday and this will trigger more spotty afternoon storms. I’m expecting drier weather to return by next Tuesday and continue into the Fourth of July holiday. There will be the chance for rain in the forecast later next week and I will iron out those extended weather details in my next forecast discussion. See you tonight at five, six, and ten!

Wes Wyatt
Chief Meteorologist WVUA-TV

Severe Thunderstorm Warning

BULLETIN – EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BIRMINGHAM AL
339 PM CDT THU JUN 28 2007

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BIRMINGHAM HAS ISSUED A

* SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING FOR…
  CENTRAL TALLADEGA COUNTY IN EAST CENTRAL ALABAMA…
  THIS INCLUDES THE CITY OF TALLADEGA…

* UNTIL 415 PM CDT

* AT 335 PM CDT…NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A
  SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING NICKEL SIZE HAIL…AND
  DAMAGING WINDS IN EXCESS OF 60 MPH.  THIS STORM WAS LOCATED NEAR  
COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES. THIS STORM WAS NEARLY STATIONARY.

* THE SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WILL BE NEAR…
  HOWELLS COVE BY 415 PM CDT…

TO REPORT SEVERE WEATHER…
CALL 1-800-856-0758.

Thursday Afternoon Update

On this date in 2004, a number of people took shelter from an approaching storm by stranding under trees lining a parkway in Georgia. That parkway was the connection between a parking lot and the beach at Buford Dam State Park. Sadly, lightning ended up striking one of the trees resulting in three fatalities and causing serious injuries for the remaining people. For the people involved, that day started off as a typical summer time day. There were no tornado warnings or thunderstorm warnings in the area. In fact, that was a non-severe thunderstorm that just happened to develop during the day.

This is lightning safety awareness week and you can never be too safe when it comes to lightning. During the summer months we don’t often think about dangerous weather on a daily basis. However, lightning can be as dangerous as it gets. This is due to the fact that, on many occasions, the weather setup in the summer promotes daytime thunderstorm growth. These cells can be rather small, covering small portions of a single county. With breaks in the clouds, the lightning can be tough to see, so your only outdoor warning is thunder. If you are working outdoors and see a dark cloud on the horizon, just remember that lightning can strike an object up to ten miles away from the storm. If you have no place to go, stay away from tall objects and crouch down. One misconception is that lightning strikes metal object’s first. Actually, the taller objects in your vicinity, such as trees, are at the highest risk of being struck. Remember, electricity travels the path of least resistance, so if there is an object that can decrease the path between the cloud base and ground, that object is at a high risk of being struck. Once again, when you hear thunder, go in-doors and wait at-least 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder to head outdoors.

Now, on to our forecast discussion, that does in fact, include an outlook on thunderstorms. Scattered thunderstorms have redeveloped, but the trend on radar seems to be how we pictured Thursday a few days ago. The coverage of thunderstorms hasn’t been as great, but I do feel some storms now developing over the central portion of the state will migrate in our direction. The lesser coverage of thunderstorms today has allowed temperatures to warm into the middle 90s. Tomorrow I do feel we will have another good coverage of scattered showers and thunderstorms. Highs will be in the lower 90s and a shower or storm will be possible tomorrow night, with lows in the 70s.

This weekend a front will be dropping into Alabama and this will bring us a good chance for a passing shower or thunderstorm on Saturday and Sunday. Some of the storms could grow strong, with highs near 90-degrees. The newer data is showing the front basically fizzling out over the southern part of the state. We may have a few thunderstorms during the afternoon on Monday, but that would be more likely south of Tuscaloosa. Dry air will be filtering in from the north late Sunday and this will set the stage for dry weather leading into the fourth of July.

Wes Wyatt
Chief Meteorologist WVUA-TV

Weather Update

The storm over Northern Hale County is moving into Southern Tuscaloosa County. While there is not a severe thunderstorm warning for Tuscaloosa County at this time, you may experience some strong gusty winds, torrential rainfall, and frequent cloud to ground lightning over the southwestern portion of the county. Be sure to seek shelter indoors if you hear thunder, and wait until 30 minuets after you hear the last clap of thunder to resume outdoor activity.

 Richard Scott